Thermonuclear 19F(p,α0)16O reaction rate

  • The thermonuclear 19F(p,α0)16O reaction rate in the temperature region 0.007-10 GK has been derived by re-evaluating the available experimental data, together with the low-energy theoretical R-matrix extrapolations. Our new rate deviates by up to about 30% compared to the previous results, although all rates are consistent within the uncertainties. At very low temperature (e.g. 0.01 GK) our reaction rate is about 20% lower than the most recently published rate, because of a difference in the low energy extrapolated S-factor and a more accurate estimate of the reduced mass used in the calculation of the reaction rate. At temperatures above~1 GK, our rate is lower, for instance, by about 20% around 1.75 GK, because we have re-evaluated the previous data (Isoya et al., Nucl. Phys. 7, 116 (1958)) in a meticulous way. The present interpretation is supported by the direct experimental data. The uncertainties of the present evaluated rate are estimated to be about 20% in the temperature region below 0.2 GK, and are mainly caused by the lack of low-energy experimental data and the large uncertainties in the existing data. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars evolve at temperatures below 0.2 GK, where the 19F(p,α)16O reaction may play a very important role. However, the current accuracy of the reaction rate is insufficient to help to describe, in a careful way, the fluorine over-abundances observed in AGB stars. Precise cross section (or S factor) data in the low energy region are therefore needed for astrophysical nucleosynthesis studies.
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Jian-Jun He, Ivano Lombardo, Daniele Dell'Aquila, Yi Xu, Li-Yong Zhang and Wei-Ping Liu. Thermonuclear 19F(p,α0)16O reaction rate[J]. Chinese Physics C, 2018, 42(1): 015001. doi: 10.1088/1674-1137/42/1/015001
Jian-Jun He, Ivano Lombardo, Daniele Dell'Aquila, Yi Xu, Li-Yong Zhang and Wei-Ping Liu. Thermonuclear 19F(p,α0)16O reaction rate[J]. Chinese Physics C, 2018, 42(1): 015001.  doi: 10.1088/1674-1137/42/1/015001 shu
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Received: 2017-09-11
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    Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11490562, 11490560, 11675229) and National Key Research and Development Program of China (2016YFA0400503)

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Thermonuclear 19F(p,α0)16O reaction rate

    Corresponding author: Jian-Jun He,
  • 1.  Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012, China
  • 2.  INFN-Sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia, I-95123, Catania, Italy
Fund Project:  Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11490562, 11490560, 11675229) and National Key Research and Development Program of China (2016YFA0400503)

Abstract: The thermonuclear 19F(p,α0)16O reaction rate in the temperature region 0.007-10 GK has been derived by re-evaluating the available experimental data, together with the low-energy theoretical R-matrix extrapolations. Our new rate deviates by up to about 30% compared to the previous results, although all rates are consistent within the uncertainties. At very low temperature (e.g. 0.01 GK) our reaction rate is about 20% lower than the most recently published rate, because of a difference in the low energy extrapolated S-factor and a more accurate estimate of the reduced mass used in the calculation of the reaction rate. At temperatures above~1 GK, our rate is lower, for instance, by about 20% around 1.75 GK, because we have re-evaluated the previous data (Isoya et al., Nucl. Phys. 7, 116 (1958)) in a meticulous way. The present interpretation is supported by the direct experimental data. The uncertainties of the present evaluated rate are estimated to be about 20% in the temperature region below 0.2 GK, and are mainly caused by the lack of low-energy experimental data and the large uncertainties in the existing data. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars evolve at temperatures below 0.2 GK, where the 19F(p,α)16O reaction may play a very important role. However, the current accuracy of the reaction rate is insufficient to help to describe, in a careful way, the fluorine over-abundances observed in AGB stars. Precise cross section (or S factor) data in the low energy region are therefore needed for astrophysical nucleosynthesis studies.

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